Choosing the right Rise and Recline Chair

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Choosing the right Rise and Recline chair is important if you are to avoid wasting your money.

Rise and Recline chairs are designed not only to help you put your feet up, recline gently for a snooze but they also raise up to assist you in getting out of the chair. Rise and Recline chairs start as low as £425 in our shop up to over £1000 and so it is important to make the right decision.

Care100 specialise in Rise and Recline chairs and have a large selection in their shop for customers to try. Kate and Gill said “There are many important considerations when buying a rise and recline chair and getting good advice is crucial. Many people also don’t know that if you have a long term chronic condition or disability, you don’t  pay VAT on these chairs”

Care100 has it’s own criteria for supplying rise and recline chairs and if you follow this advice, your purchase should be suited to your needs and will provide many comfortable hours.

To be comfortable, a chair needs to give you support where you need it. When you are buying a chair, give yourself time to sit in it for as long as possible. In the right chair

  • you should be able to sit with your bottom right at the back of the seat and your feet flat on the floor
  • your thighs should be level and your lower legs straight up and down
  • you should be able to get two fingers between your knees and the seat
  • the seat should be wide enough to fit you but not so wide that it doesn’t offer you any support

If you are buying a rise and recline chair for someone who is unable to visit the shop, any reputable supplier should be able to show you how to take accurate measurements to ensure a comfortable fit.

Single or Dual Motor

A single motor will lift your feet up and then gently recline the back. On a chair with a dual motor, the footrest and the back are operated by 2 different motors and will give you more choices of sitting positions. The dual motor chairs also recline much further and may be more suitable for someone who sleeps in the chair. However, the single motor chairs usually only have 2 buttons (up and down) and the dual motor can have 4 or 5 buttons. Consider carefully the person who will be using the chair. Would it be easier for them with only a choice of ‘up’ and ‘down’ or will they manage 5 buttons?

Positioning in the room

The chair will need an electrical socket (without trailing wires across the room) and also space for the chair to recline. The chair must not touch the wall as it is reclining as this will burn the motor out. Always check the measurement of the chair you are considering to see if it will fit into the allocated space. If there is not enough room for the chair to recline, ask about a wallhugger. These can usually be placed within 6 or 8 inches of the wall as the mechanism is slightly different.

Your health

To use a rise and recline chair safely, it is important to be honest about your health. This type of chair may not be suitable for someone who is easily confused or someone who cannot weight bear on their legs. However, if the controls are used by carers, these chairs can be of great help in moving someone with limited mobility.  If in doubt, ask for an assessment by an occupational therapist

 

Kate and Gill have a wide selection of rise and recline chairs in their showroom. They offer expert advice and fast delivery of your chosen chair. Customers are welcome to come and try the chairs for as long as they like. If you are buying a chair for someone who is unable to come to the shop, Kate and Gill will come to your house to get the correct measurements and advise on the chairs available.